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ImageA study has found that the inability to detect sarcasm or lies may be an early sign of dementia.

A group of scientists at the University of California, San Francisco has determined which areas of the brain govern a person's ability to detect sarcasm and lies.

Some of the adults in the group were healthy, but many of the test subjects had neurodegenerative diseases that cause certain parts of the brain to deteriorate.

The UCSF team mapped their brains using magnetic resonance imaging, MRI, which showed associations between the deteriorations of particular parts of the brain and the inability to detect insincere speech.

"These patients cannot detect lies," UCSF neuropsychologist Katherine Rankin, PhD, a member of the UCSF Memory and Aging Center and the senior author of the study, said.

"This fact can help them be diagnosed earlier," she said.

Rankin and her postdoctoral fellow Tal Shany-Ur, PhD made a presentation titled, ''Divergent Neuroanatomic Correlates of Sarcasm and Lie Comprehension in Neurodegenerative Disease''.

At the presentation they showed the data, which suggests that it may be possible to spot people with particular neurodegenerative diseases early just by looking for the telltale sign of their inability to detect lies.

"We have to find these people early," Rankin said.

In general scientists believe that catching people early in the disease will provide the best opportunity for intervention when drugs become available.

The study is part of a larger body of work at UCSF's Memory and Aging Center examining emotion and social behaviour in neurodegenerative diseases as tools for better predicting, preventing, and diagnosing these conditions.

The ability to detect lies resides in the brain's frontal lobe. In diseases like frontotemporal dementia, this is one of the areas that progressively degenerates because of the accumulation of damaged proteins known as tau and the death of neurons in those areas.

Because the frontal lobes play a significant role in complex, higher-order human behaviours, losing the ability to detect lies is only one of several ways the disease may manifest.

The first signs of the disease may be any number of severe behavioural changes. Ironically, these signs are often missed because they are misattributed to depression or an extreme form of midlife crisis.

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